Sourced Market going for the hyper local crowdfunding on the CrowdBnk.

Sourced Market going for the hyper local crowdfunding on the CrowdBnk.

LSS’11 Day 2 Report & Trends for 2012 (free, 34 pages)

This report covers all seven session from day two of Local Social Summit 2011 (LSS’11). Additionally, we have pulled together our view on the most important trends to watch in 2012 - including:

  • Incumbents are at risk
  • Data is everywhere
  • The rebirth of local
  • Mobile broadband
  • The next Internet arrives
  • The death of daily deals
  • Social outsourcing grows.

Plus this covers our 2 session on social network analysis and one on Big Brand Local, which is 2012 evolves into “big brand social” and raises questions around how best to leverage Facebook without spamming your friends/customers/community.

In addition to the Slideshare embed below, you can also download the report from DropBox (1.8MB). The Day 1 report is HERE.

LSS’11 Opening Talk - Day 2, Session 1: The First Digital Olympics – London 2012 & the BBC

This is a recap and key insights from the opening talk on Day 2 of LSS’11. With only 122 days to go until the Olympics we figured it was high time to get this post published. To kick things off we think this video with Idris Elba from The Wire is nice way to start the excitment.

Opening Talk - Day 2, Session 1: The First Digital Olympics – London 2012 & the BBC

Speaker: Tim Plyming is the Project Executive; Digital & Editor Live Sites in the BBC’s London 2012 project team. He leads the day to day activity of the ‘Digital Olympics’ project which is responsible for the delivery of all 2012 content across digital platforms including online, mobile and connected TV.

Background: London 2012 will be the first tablet Olympics, the first connected TV Olympics and the first 3D Olympics.  The BBC is the host nation broadcaster of all the Games and have one amazing year planned for 2012. Tim provided LSS’11 attendees with a sneak preview of the BBC’s plans.

LSS Key Insights from this session:

  • London 2012 in the first truly digital Olympics.
  • 100% of the content will be available. That’s 3000 hours of TV.
  • A massive four screen event with HD video at the heart of it.
  • All the meta data will be made available plus custom page for each athlete making for a rich data experience – “a wiki-Olympic-pedia.”
  • This will be a social media Olympics. People will be adding to the official content.
  • There will a local angle – both in the UK and globally. This includes the torch relay, outside local screens and how fans interact with the events.
  • London 2012 will show the way for future Olympics. Innovation from London will lead the way for Brazil 2016.

Session Summary:

“We’re calling the 2012 Summer Games the first truly digital Olympics, because 2012 is also the year we switch off the analogue signal [in the UK]” explained Tim Plyming, project executive, digital & editor live sites, BBC London 2012.

2012 Massive Digital Content Year in the UK: But that only tells half the story. As Plyming explained, the amount of content generated by the Olympics is equivalent of six World Cups happening every day for 16 days.

 “In fact, 2012 is a massive year from the start of the summer,” he said. “It starts with the analogue switch-off in April, then there’s the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in June, when our operation will be four times the size of the one for this year’s royal wedding [Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding in May 2011]. Then there’s the 70 days of the torch relay, which will be when the Games comes to people outside London, and which will be a huge outside broadcast operation. After the Olympics there’s a two-week break and then the Paralympic Games. And then there’s all the events of the Cultural Olympiad. Every outside broadcast truck in Northern Europe will be in London next summer.”

100% of the Olympic Content Available: For the BBC, the London Games will represent a step change in the amount of material it broadcasts.  “The Olympic Broadcaster creates 3000 hours of television,” Plyming explained. “For the Sydney Games, we were only able to show 300 hours of that. By Beijing, we showed half of it. In 2012, our commitment is to allow people to watch everything live – up to 24 different events at a time – and the internet will be a broadcast-critical service for that.”

Four-Screen Event: Plyming also explained that the BBC is thinking of the London Games as very much a four-screen event. “The Coronation in 1953 was the first mass TV event, and there was one TV per street. 2012 will be another defining moment in the move from analogue to digital broadcasting. “The heart of it will be the video services. There will be 24 HD feeds, immediately on-demand. It’s the basis of the iPlayer service taken to the next level. Then mobile and tablet will be a complimentary experience. Users will be able to pull up the commentator information service, and we’ll do video where we can.”

Content Enrichment – “wiki-Olympic-pedia”: The other big step forward will be the amount of metadata about the Games that the BBC will make available to the audience for the first time. “The commentator information service has always been privileged information for the commentary teams. It’s how commentators know all the statistics and details of the events,” Plyming explained.

“We’re stripping it out and providing it to viewers, allowing them to pull it up alongside the video. Then we’ll allow the audience to play with that. It’ll be interesting to see how all the platforms are used, both separately and together, and it’ll be useful to see how content trends across those devices. There’s such a huge amount of content that we’ll be seeing trending as a means of navigation.”

Social Olympics: Plyming is also interested in how social element will change the content, on top of that, how the fact that people’s devices know where they are will affect the way the data is sliced. 

As well as all the data from the commentator information service, there will be a page for every athlete from every country, with all their stats and all the video of them from the Games, both live and on-demand.

Local Olympics: Beyond this, Plyming said, are the big screens. There will be 30 of them around the UK, and the BBC sees part of the role of these screens in reaching out to expat communities, what it calls “Find the world in London.”

“There will be one million Russians in London next summer, so we’re expanding the outdoor experience in Hyde Park, allowing communities to watch what they want to watch across six screens. Half of the 204 competing countries have communities of more than 100,000 people in London.” 

Response to Questions: In response to a question, Plyming said that the BBC would like to do a lot with social media around the Games, but that it was restricted by the IOC’s concerns about video leakage. Instead, he said. All the data would be shared and that would be used to drive people back to the BBC coverage. This led on to a question about monetisation, which he answered by saying that the BBC was looking to commercialise “the London story”, what Plyming referred to as “what’s outside the fence” via the BBC Worldwide. But he admitted that the BBC having sole UK rights did pose a problem for sponsors.

London’s Impact on Future Olympics: He also said he sees these Games as a staging post for the future.  “It’ll be interesting to see what these Games mean for next Summer Games in Rio,” he said. “We can try lots of things and see how they work, and Rio is looking for UK companies to see how they can help with the 2016 Games. It’s a big opportunity for people.”

Please note: this session summary will also be part of our LSS’11 Day 2 conference report that we will publish in April - if you want a copy please email info[at]localsocialsummit[dot]com or contact Dylan Fuller.

-end-

Local Social Summit - weekly wrap up 23-March-12

Self Serve

Here’s our pick of interesting news, posts and insights that are worth reading during this sunny first week of Spring 2012…

  1. Unpacking the Twisted Thinking of Small Business Self-Service Online - guest post on Streetfight by Perry Evans, CEO Closely (and regular LSS keynote speaker).
  2. No Corporate Website? You Don’t Need One. Welcome to the Post-Web era. <— we agree with this from RWW, you do not need a website. A Tumblr and Facebook page is more than enough for most local businesses.
  3. SoLoMo: Mobile Offers the Purest Form - interesting insights and data on mobile offers, and user behaviour.
  4. How Small Brands Can Look Big On Facebook Timeline - nice one and a UK example.

We are also making some plans to attend Big Data Week events in LDN in April. 

LSS’11 Day 1 Report & Trends for 2012 (free, 39 pages)

The LSS team finally published the LSS’11 Day 1 Report. Below is a copy (embeded from Slidshare). The report also includes a set of awesome insights and trends to watch in 2012, helping to make it relevant 4 months later. You can download the report from Slideshare and also from DropBox (its a pdf, 1.3mb).
Please feel free to share this report. To quote it and repost. We would be grateful for any comments and feedback. Just email us on info[at]localsocialsummit[dot]com. 

Local Social Summit Report No 1 & Trends for 2012

Local Social Summit - weekly wrap up 16-March-12

Here are some interesting stories that we followed this week. All of which we’re adding to our “watch list” - if they become important or significant we will report back.

  1. Mobile App Builder and SMB Commerce Tool App Express Launches @SXSW - on Greg Sterling’s blog
  2. The Curation-Over-Creation Trend That Fueled Pinterest’s Rapid Growth - on ReadWriteWeb
  3. foursquare on Facebook is now prettier! - on the foursquare official blog
  4. Can Visual.ly spawn the data scientists of the future? - on Gigaom

Local Social Summit also released our first report on LSS’11 Day 1 & Trends to watch for 2012 [FREE pdf download, 1.3mb, from DropBox]. More on this next week.

This new app - Everplaces - looks pretty cool. We will get the Local Social Labs team to give is test.
fastcompany:

Everplaces is a new app that essentially functions as a Pinterest for the real world. It lets you capture and store places in the physical world that you want to keep track of, whether that’s a swank bistro in your hometown or a boutique in Buenas Aires that always has the best cutting-edge fashions.
Everplaces Creates A Pinterest For The Real World

This new app - Everplaces - looks pretty cool. We will get the Local Social Labs team to give is test.

fastcompany:

Everplaces is a new app that essentially functions as a Pinterest for the real world. It lets you capture and store places in the physical world that you want to keep track of, whether that’s a swank bistro in your hometown or a boutique in Buenas Aires that always has the best cutting-edge fashions.

Everplaces Creates A Pinterest For The Real World

Has Bean does In My Mug episode 171 with Bolivia Bolinda Illimani. Awesome. Just killing it on social media. Stephen Leighton is a legend!

Young & Foodish invades New York with a Burger Swarm! This simply is great use of social media. And good fun.